• jmeineker@hvc.rr.com

Range

 Range

Welcome to the Range Page.

Guest policy – the guest policy has changed somewhat due to By Law revisions. The By Laws effective 6/14/12 now state “to bring one (1) guest at a time to use the shooting facilities no more than three times per year for each guest”. New By Law booklets been printed and are available.

Contact

Committee Chairman:   Dave Leschke   845-978-4180    clays128@aol.com

 

Range Information

Please note that due to insurance regulations; 

The use of any reloaded ammunition is strictly at the user’s own risk.

Thanks to the diligent efforts of our Range Safety Officer and the Range Committee, our range building has a new safety feature.  The line as seen in the picture clearly indicates the safe zone where shooters must stand whenever someone has gone downrange.  The use of this visual aid is designed to prevent accidental handling of firearms or ammunition whenever the range is cold for shooters to hang targets or otherwise go downrange.  It will make administration much easier for RSO’s that are monitoring safety especially during range events.

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Please clean up after yourself! 

We continue to find unexpended (live) ammunition lying on the ground.  This is a very dangerous situation.  Please take care to pick up all ammunition and dispose of properly.

 

If you must shoot at cans, please take them with you.  Do not dispose of them in the barrel in the range house.  In any case, please don’t use beer cans.  Appearance is everything.  Think about how it looks.

 

General Rules

Safe Gun Handling Explained

Muzzleloading/Black Powder Safety


General Rules

  1. Shooting Hours
    Monday through Saturday – 8:00 am to standard sunset
    Sunday – 9:00 am to standard sunset     (Check the computer on the table in the range house for current sunset time or at the bottom of this page)
    Note: Exceptions allowing night shooting for organized activities under lights may be made of Board approval and membership approval.
  2. Range Availability
    Range remains open all year. Certain daily closures may be made for scheduled shoots or activities. All shooting, except for archery or when hunting, must occur on the range area only. Hunters, archers, and hikers must assume responsibility to stay clear of the range area. Danger signs are posted along the perimeter of the range area.
  3. Range Use Log
    Must be signed each and every time you use the range. Enter date, time, your name, your guest’s name, and activity. If you hear shooting other than on our range, or note anything else of of order (such as range left messy) make a note in the log. We need this to run down problems and track usage.
  4. Alcohol
    It is common sense, accepted modern gun safety policy, and club policy that no alcoholic beverages be consumed prior to using any firearm or bow. Even the smallest amount of alcohol disqualifies you from range use for the day.
  5. Loaded Guns
    No loaded guns are allowed in the club house at any time. Additionally, guns will not be worn to club meetings or other group functions. This is done in deference to safety and in consideration of political or other guests. We cannot afford to appear like would-be “cowboys”. Except at scheduled shoots, loaded handguns worn in a holster are acceptable on the grounds or in the range building. However, they must be either unloaded or used as soon as they are unholstered. “Basic Safe Gun Handling Rules” must always be followed.
  6. Courtesy
    Only take up as much room as you really need. Use the picnic tables for additional equipment, not other shooting stations. If you bring a guest or family members, use common sense in using shooting stations. If the range is crowded, you must share your station with your guest rather than taking up two stations. If people are waiting, offer to share the bench, or at least limit your own time. If shooting is in progress, put your muffs on outside or wait until shooters pause. Club policy allows only one guest. Please refer to the membership page for details.
  7. Range Conflict
    Trap field and rifle range cannot be used simultaneously. Shooters should be courteous enough to rotate back and forth. We suggest rotating in half hour blocks.
  8. Smoking
    Due to the possible presence of unburned powder on floors or tables and because some shooters may have quantities of smokeless or black powder (explosive!) for loading, smoking is not allowed at any time inside the range building.
  9. Shooting Positions
    Most offhand shooting should occur at the last two doors, generally referred to as the “pistol area”. The other four stations are usually set up for “rested” rifle shooting. Our range is very flexible and again, common sense and courtesy should be used in selecting a shooting station. If shooting a semiautomatic of any sort, try to set up so that your spent casings won’t hit or disturb others.
  10. Target Stands
    Movable target stands are provided for shooting at ranges of 50 feet, 25 years, 50 yards, and 75 yards. Permanent stands are located at 100, 125, and 150 yards. We provide these as a courtesy and convenience. We do not have an inexhaustible supply. If you are aiming your shots, you should be able to hit inside a 2 foot by 2 foot square. If you shoot full length silhouettes, please provide your own target stand. Always make sure your target stand is in line with your firing point. If shooting short range, try to set up so that you avoid hitting the long range targets.
  11. Targets
    We recommend only paper and clay birds as targets. If you must shoot plastic bottles, balloons, bowling pins, or cans, bring your own and clean up your mess. Absolutely no glass targets are allowed. Do not leave other unburnable trash at the club or in the burn barrel.  Pull all used targets from stands and place in burn barrel.
  12. Housekeeping
    You are responsible for cleaning up your own targets, brass, cleaning materials, and beverage containers. Empty brass must be cleaned up. Reloadable cartridge cases only may be left in the marked barrel. Do not leave non-reloadable junk brass, take it home. Generally, shotgun slug cases are not sought after for reloading, please take empties with you.
  13. Front Gate
    Our gate policy is that it must be closed and locked when no one is present. We recommend that during hte months of October, November, and December that you close and lock the gate after yourself to prevent unwanted visitors. It may be left open if you know others are, or will be present. Always spin the numbers and leave the lock closed on the chain.
  14. Security
    The last person out must assume responsibility for all security. Check all doors and windows. Turn lights off. Please use heat and lights responsibly. Double check clubhouse lights and security. Of course, lock the gate after yourself on exit.
  15. Discipline
    The Board reserves its rights under the Bylaws to discipline any member or willfully or negligently violates range or other club rules.
  16. Range Safety Strobes and Firearm Safety Line
    1. Use of the safety strobes and trimmer line is mandatory for everyone even if you are alone on the range.  Members, please see the safety pages on this website for instructions on proper usage of these safety features.

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Safe Gun Handling Explained

  1. Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. Treat every gun as is it was loaded.
    If you always have absolute control of the muzzle, no accident to man, beast, or property is possible. Handguns especially need careful attention because it is easy to point such a short object inan unintentional direction. Muzzle direction should always be downrange or straight up. When leaving or approaching the firing line, the muzzle should be pointed straight up. This is true any time you are on a hard surface such as concrete.
  2. Always keep the action open until ready to load and fire.
    As long as the action is fully open, it is extremely unlikely that the gun will discharge. There is always a way to keep the action open. There are a very few guns that do not provide for any “action open” position. In this case, an open bolt indicator (OBI), a piece of wood dowel, or an empty cartridge case may be used to hold the action open. If you don’t know how to keep the action open, check your manual or ask a truly knowledgeable person As soon as the gun is removed from case or holster, its action must be opened. Uncased guns must have the action open in your vehicle (NY Law) and as you bring it to the line. Guns on the line or in the rack must have actions open until actually ready ot fire. An exception is made for “break action” firearms.
  3. Never load the gun (in chamber or magazine0 until actually ready to fire. Never take another person’s word that the gun is unloaded.
    Don’t even assume that you left the gun unloaded. Check it out! In many instances on the range, it is just as easy and safer to load single rounds. If you choose to load the magazine or cylinder, count the number of cartridges you load and fire. Your life, or someone else’s could depend on it. Remember Dirty Harry’s question? “I know what you’re thinkin’ ;unk. Did I shoot five times or six? Well,… do ya feel lucky, punk?” We can’t affort to trust luck. Keep track of your cartidges. An easy way to do this is to load out of ammo boxes either singly or in multiples of 5 or 10. I fyou buy loose ammo, you can repackage it. Know where every live round is.
  4. Always keep your finger off the trigger, and keep the safety on until you’re actually ready to fire.
    If you have any pressure on the trigger, the gun may discharge as soon as you move the safety. The safety is only a mechanical devise and as such it may fail. Do not rely on the safety! It is your last line of defense not hte first. Your behavior is the first line of defense.
  5. Always know your gun, its proper operation, and proper ammunition.
    Be certain that the bore is clear. Again, if you are unsure of anything, don’t attempt to laod and fire. Consult the manual or a knowledgeable person. If you know the absolute correct answer to another person’s questions, give it. If not, be big enough to say “I don’t know”.
  6. Never touch a firearm in any way when someon is going “Down range”. Call out “is the line clear?” before moving down range.
    It is your responsibility to check the line before going “down range”. If is your responsibility to call out “Hold on, loaded gun” if any gun is not completely empty. All guns must be empty in both chamber and magazine and have actions open before anyone goes down range.
  7. Never leave a firearm, loaded or unloaded, unattended or stored in a precarious position.
    A fall can not only damage a gun but discharge it. A fall might make it unsafe for future use. Be especially vigilant if strangers or children are present. If you have not locked the front gate, it is possible to have your gun(s) stolen while you’re in the club house or down range. This recently happened! Use common sense.
  8. Always be sure of your target and what is beyond.
    Aim every shot carefully. Emptying a magazine on a semiautomatic as fast as spossible is not “aimed fire”. All shooting, except for archery or while hunting, must take place on the trap field or from inside the range building. Do not shoot in the air or at hard objects. Make sure your target is in line with your firing position. This is done for courtesy ad safety. The “pipes” are perpendicular to the middle of the building. Know where your shot will go after it goes through the target stand. There may be archers or hunters onthe groundds. It is their responsibility to stay off the range. It is your responsibility to keep your shots on the range.
  9. Never use alcohol or take medication that may influence your judgement or reflexes prior to shooting.
    Don’t attempt shooting if you are too tired, sick, or distracted to do so with complete safety. No alcohol allowed in the range building if shooting is in progress. Even the smalled amount of alcohol disqualifies you from range use for the day.
  10. Always wear sufficient eye and ear protection.
    Your two eyes and ears are not replaceable like spark plugs. Most damage to these delicate organs is not repairable. Blindness will prevent you from shooting, hunting, working, fishing, or seeing hte things and people you love. Deafness will prevent you from hearing noises in the woods, speech, music, television, and radio.

Members must assume full responsibility for their own safety as well as that of their family members and any guest they bring to the facilities. Members must see that their guest and family members follow our general and range rules. Additionally, it is the member’s responsibility to provide eye and ear protection for their party and to see tha it is worn when shooting.

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Attention All Shooters!

Even if you are not a black powder shooter, you should have at least some knowledge of the safety precautions. First, you can help ensure that shooters on the range are following good procedure. Second, since they will be around you, it is in your best interest to see that they are acting safely.

Muzzleloading/Black Powder Safety

In addition to our 10 “Basic Safe Gun Handling Rules”, members must:

  1. Never attempt to fire an old or questionable firearm until is has been inspected by a competent gunsmith.
    He must be willing to certify that it is safe to fire. A weak or damaged gun may explode causing injury or death to the shooter and bystanders.
  2. Never attempt to load and fire your firearm if you uncertain as to the proper load.
    You must know recommended projectile diameter and weight, powder type and charge weight, cap, and lubrication. You must know the proper procedure for loading your firearm. If any doubt exists, consult a reference book or truly knowledgaable person. Never attempt extra heavy or “guessed at” loads or substitute smokeless powder of any kind.
  3. Always use extreme caution during loading.
    Never load directly from the powder source. Never use steel spoons, measures, funnels, etc. Always use brass or plastic (Spark danger!) Never store powder in glass, store it in the original container, in a cool, dark, dry place. Sotre poweder and caps where unknowing people and children can’t get to them.
  4. Always web swab the bore between loadings.
    Do not put a cap on the nipple or chare the pan on a flintlock before charging the barrel. Keep caps and flints away from powder.
  5. Always concentrate on what you are doing.
    Avoid distractions and interruptions. Avoid conversations with others while actually loading unless you are describing the procedure. Double charges or missing charges can be troublesome at least and dangerous at worst.
  6. Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, including while loading.
    Never put your face near or over the muzzle. Never lean on or place your hand over the muzzle. If you experience a misfire, keep the muzzle down range. Wait at least one minute before attempting to reprime or recap.
  7. Always keep the “Basic Safe Gun Handling” and “General Rules” in mind.
    Our porcedures dealing iwth eye and ear protection, smoking, alcohol use, courtesy, and housekeeping are especially important to black powder shooters. Is it extremely important to your safety and that of others on the range tha we all follow the rules exactly. Please make sure that you clean up yourarea by sweeping out any powder, caps, dust, etc.

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